Minimally Invasive Surgery

Minimally_Invasive_Surgery

For the treatment of prostate cancer and kidney conditions.

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Female Incontinence

Female_Urinary_Incontinence

Learn more about the symptoms of female incontinence and how LUC treats this condition.

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Help for Sensitive Problems

Suffering_from_BPH

BPH is a common condition that affects many men over the age of 60.

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Bladder Cancer

Cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the body. These extra cells grow together and form masses, called tumors. In bladder cancer, these growths happen in the bladder.

The bladder is the part of your urinary tractClick here to see more information. that stores your urine until you are ready to let it out. See a picture of the female urinary systemClick here to see an illustration. or male urinary systemClick here to see an illustration..

Bladder cancer can usually be cured if it is found and treated early. And most bladder cancer is found early.
What causes bladder cancer?

We don't know what causes bladder cancer. But being exposed to certain chemicals or cigarette smoking raises your risk. And like other cancers, changes in the DNA of your cells seem to play a role. Also, when the lining of the bladder is irritated for a long time, cell changes that lead to cancer may occur. Some things that cause this are radiation treatment, having catheters in place for a long time, or having the parasite that causes schistosomiasis.
What are the symptoms?

Blood in the urine is the main symptom. Other symptoms may include having to urinate often or feeling pain when you urinate.

These symptoms can be caused by other problems, including a urinary tract infectionClick here to see more information.. Always call your doctor if you see blood in your urine.

How is bladder cancer diagnosed?

To diagnose bladder cancer, your doctor will:

  • Ask about your medical history and do a physical exam, including a vaginal or rectal exam.
  • Test your urine to look for blood or abnormal cells.
  • Do a cystoscopyClick here to see more information., a test that lets your doctor look into your bladder with a thin, lighted viewing tool. Small tissue samples (biopsiesClick here to see more information.) are taken and looked at under a microscope to find out if there are cancer cells.

How is it treated?

Treatment choices for bladder cancer include:

  • Surgery to remove any cancer. Sometimes lasers or other methods can be used to get rid of tumors.
  • ChemotherapyClick here to see more information., which uses medicine to destroy cancer cells.
  • ImmunotherapyClick here to see more information., which causes your body's natural defense system to attack bladder cancer cells.
  • Radiation therapyClick here to see more information., which uses high-dose X-rays to kill cancer cells.

The treatment depends a lot on how much the cancer has grown. Most bladder cancers are treated without having to remove the bladder.

Sometimes doctors do have to remove the bladder. For some people, this means having urine flow into a bag outside of the body. But in many cases, doctors can make a new bladder—using other body tissue—that works very much like the old one.

Bladder cancer often comes back. The new tumors can often be treated easily if they are caught early. So it’s very important to have regular checkups after your treatment is done.

It’s common to feel scared, sad, or angry after finding out that you have bladder cancer. Talking to others who have had the disease may help you feel better. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.
What increases your chances of getting bladder cancer?

Anything that increases your chances of getting a disease is called a risk factor. The main risk factors for bladder cancer include:

  • Smoking. Cigarette smokers are much more likely than other people to get bladder cancer.
  • Being older than 40, being male, or being white (Caucasian).
  • Being exposed to cancer-causing chemicals, such as those used in the wood, rubber, and textile industries.
  • What you eat. A diet high in fried meats and fats increases your risk for bladder cancer.
  • Parasites. There is a parasite that causes schistosomiasis, which can increase your risk. This condition is sometimes found in developing countries and rarely occurs in North America.
Cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the body. These extra cells grow together and form masses, called tumors. In bladder cancer, these growths happen in the bladder.

The bladder is the part of your urinary tractClick here to see more information. that stores your urine until you are ready to let it out. See a picture of the female urinary systemClick here to see an illustration. or male urinary systemClick here to see an illustration..

Bladder cancer can usually be cured if it is found and treated early. And most bladder cancer is found early.
What causes bladder cancer?

We don't know what causes bladder cancer. But being exposed to certain chemicals or cigarette smoking raises your risk. And like other cancers, changes in the DNA of your cells seem to play a role. Also, when the lining of the bladder is irritated for a long time, cell changes that lead to cancer may occur. Some things that cause this are radiation treatment, having catheters in place for a long time, or having the parasite that causes schistosomiasis.
What are the symptoms?

Blood in the urine is the main symptom. Other symptoms may include having to urinate often or feeling pain when you urinate.

These symptoms can be caused by other problems, including a urinary tract infectionClick here to see more information.. Always call your doctor if you see blood in your urine.
How is bladder cancer diagnosed?

To diagnose bladder cancer, your doctor will:

* Ask about your medical history and do a physical exam, including a vaginal or rectal exam.
* Test your urine to look for blood or abnormal cells.
* Do a cystoscopyClick here to see more information., a test that lets your doctor look into your bladder with a thin, lighted viewing tool. Small tissue samples (biopsiesClick here to see more information.) are taken and looked at under a microscope to find out if there are cancer cells.

How is it treated?

Treatment choices for bladder cancer include:

* Surgery to remove any cancer. Sometimes lasers or other methods can be used to get rid of tumors.
* ChemotherapyClick here to see more information., which uses medicine to destroy cancer cells.
* ImmunotherapyClick here to see more information., which causes your body's natural defense system to attack bladder cancer cells.
* Radiation therapyClick here to see more information., which uses high-dose X-rays to kill cancer cells.

The treatment depends a lot on how much the cancer has grown. Most bladder cancers are treated without having to remove the bladder.

Sometimes doctors do have to remove the bladder. For some people, this means having urine flow into a bag outside of the body. But in many cases, doctors can make a new bladder—using other body tissue—that works very much like the old one.

Bladder cancer often comes back. The new tumors can often be treated easily if they are caught early. So it’s very important to have regular checkups after your treatment is done.

It’s common to feel scared, sad, or angry after finding out that you have bladder cancer. Talking to others who have had the disease may help you feel better. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.
What increases your chances of getting bladder cancer?

Anything that increases your chances of getting a disease is called a risk factor. The main risk factors for bladder cancer include:

* Smoking. Cigarette smokers are much more likely than other people to get bladder cancer.
* Being older than 40, being male, or being white (Caucasian).
* Being exposed to cancer-causing chemicals, such as those used in the wood, rubber, and textile industries.
* What you eat. A diet high in fried meats and fats increases your risk for bladder cancer.
* Parasites. There is a parasite that causes schistosomiasis, which can increase your risk. This condition is sometimes found in developing countries and rarely occurs in North America.

Trust the Experience

Established in 1951, the partners of Lubbock Urology Clinic  (Howard Beck MD, K Sonny Mahal MD, Girish Vallabhan MD) are proud to announce the expansion of our partnership to include Carl Britton MD, Jorge Brothers MD, and Scott Spore MD. To best serve the needs of our patients amidst significant challenges in healthcare, we have taken steps to consolidate resources and expertise. We feel that this will help us maintain a strong private practice of medicine in the field of Urology in West Texas and Eastern New Mexico. We believe that private practice remains the best model to provide high quality, efficient, cost effective, and timely service and care for our patients.

Our new expanded partnership has significant expertise in ALL aspects of Urologic care from pediatrics to adults, male and female urology, stone disease, oncology, incontinence, erectile dysfunction, male infertility, female sexual dysfunction, female pelvic health, etc. Our physicians have considerable experience in traditional Urologic Surgery and have expertise and fellowship training including the newer minimally invasive techniques such as Laparoscopy and Robotics. We strive to stay abreast of technologic advances such as the appropriate use of Lasers, neuromodulation, etc.

Our providers are active staff members of all major hospitals in Lubbock. We look forward to continue working with individual practitioners and members of medical groups and to expand our relationships. We are truly excited and blessed to assemble and offer a First Class team of Urologic experts for the people of West Texas and Eastern New Mexico!  Please remember our Urology team as the preferred option for your patients.

da Vinci Prostatectomy in Action!

KLBK News in Lubbock, TX reports: Girish C. Vallabhan, M.D. explains the benefits of the minimally invasive option for prostatectomy using the da Vinci robotics platform.

Is Prostate Screening Right for You?

  • Know your risk.
  • When should men start routine screening?
  • Concerns?